Conor McGregor's showdown with Jose Aldo estimated to make €91 MILLION - even before a punch is thrown

Research carried out by Onside showed The Notorious was ranked only behind Brian O’Driscoll, Paul O’Connell, Katie Taylor, Roy Keane and Rory McIlroy in terms of Ireland’s greatest sporting achievers.

Research carried out by Onside showed The Notorious was ranked only behind Brian O’Driscoll, Paul O’Connell, Katie Taylor, Roy Keane and Rory McIlroy in terms of Ireland’s greatest sporting achievers.

Conor McGregor’s UFC showdown with Jose Aldo is estimated to rake in more than €91 million – before a punch is even thrown.

The hugely anticipated clash for the world featherweight championship belt is set to be beamed into at least 1.4million homes worldwide, at a pay-per-view average cost of €54.  That puts the take from television screenings alone at a monster €77m.

That, in addition to an anticipated €9m in gate receipts for the Las Vegas brawl, pushes the total revenue well towards the €91m mark, before sponsorship deals are even considered.

The 1.4million in pay-per-view sales will be the second highest in the UFC’s history, second only to UFC 100, which saw Brock Lesnar take on Frank Mir for the Heavyweight Championship in 2009.

Win or lose, The Notorious stands to rake in a huge windfall from what is undoubtedly the biggest fight of his career to date.

McGregor will receive a percentage of both the pay-per-view and gate incomes, but the UFC have not revealed what this figure will be.

But looking at previous events, headlining fighters are typically offered a cut of pay-per-view revenue as an incentive to promote the event, with their share increasing in line with higher viewing figures.

For 100,000 sales, an MMA star could expect 90c from every fee.  If the event clears 500,000 buys, a fighter could expect to receive €2 from each fee.  These are not official figures, but are based on previous reports of UFC pay structures.

With McGregor going above and beyond in his role as promoter for the clash with Jose Aldo, and an anticipated 1.4million pay-per-view sales, he could reasonably expect a minimum of €5 from every sale – or €7.6m in total.

When gate receipts and sponsorship deals are taken into consideration, it looks as though McGregor will easily take home at least €9m for the fight, before even throwing a punch.

Whatever the outcome of the crunch fight, McGregor still remains the number one in the eyes of 137,000 Irish fans.

Defeat will be unthinkable for the Dubliner, but he’s already a huge hero to hundreds of thousands of fans, who placed him sixth in the rankings of our most admired sporting stars.

Research carried out by sponsorship consultants Onside, showed The Notorious was ranked only behind Brian O’Driscoll, Paul O’Connell, Katie Taylor, Roy Keane and Rory McIlroy in terms of Ireland’s greatest sporting achievers. Even at this early stage of his career, McGregor is rated higher than legends like Henry Shefflin, Ronan O’Gara and Sonia O’Sullivan.

Onside CEO John Trainor told the Irish Sunday Mirror: “Conor has entered the Top 10 for the first time in 2015 and is now ranked 6th in the minds of the Irish public – just behind Rory McIlroy. Through this lens he currently has the equivalent of 137,000 Irish adults that
think he is Ireland’s most admirable sports personality.

“That’s a very solid base at such an early stage in his career.”

More than 10,000 Irish fans made the trip to Sin City to cheer their idol on.  On Friday, thousands queued from dawn for the 3pm weigh-in and a chance to see their hero. The atmosphere was intense as always as McGregor made the cut at 145lbs, the same weight as rival Aldo. Chants of “ole, ole, ole” rang out through the venue as McGregor took to the stage draped in a tricolour.

He told his adoring supporters: “I just want to thank the Irish fans for coming out here for me.  Tomorrow night I will bring that gold home for Ireland once again.”